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Liverpool Curling Club looking forward to the future

<p>A member of the junior curling group throws a stone at the Liverpool Curling Club. The club is looking to boost its membership by building both the sport and the social aspect around curling. </p>
<p>A member of the junior curling group throws a stone at the Liverpool Curling Club. The club is looking to boost its membership by building both the sport and the social aspect around curling. </p>

LIVERPOOL - The Liverpool Curling Club has had more than its share of struggles in the past few years, but with most of those behind it the board of directors is looking to rebuild the sport and social aspect the club once had.  

Over the past few years, the club has had to deal with aging equipment giving out. Two years ago it was the chiller, which was a $60,000 replacement. This year the dehumidifier broke down and required a replacement.

Membership is about on par from last year, says curling club board member Allen Foster, but board members want to increase the numbers.

"We're trying to make an active club again," he says.

The biggest issue, he says, is the number of current members is not enough to sustain the club long term. Even though most of their equipment woes are behind them, members still have to contend with large power bills.

However the executive is ready to tackle the challenges, says Foster.

"We have a great bunch of volunteers. Everyone does something," he says.

For example, instead of having one person take on certain duties, such as scraping and pebbling the ice, Foster says the duties are distributed it among several people. That makes it so curling can still take place if one person is sick or cannot make it in.

Foster says the board is trying to build up these social aspect of the club as well.

A new venture the club tried was a breakfast fundraiser. Foster says being the first one, organizers were unsure how many people would come out and planned for 80, but ended up selling out by 9:30 a.m. The cooks improvised a pancake breakfast to make it until 11 a.m., but the success showed the club it was on to something.

Going forward, the club will host breakfasts on the fourth Saturday of each month.

A turkey dinner was hosted on Dec. 14 as well, and more suppers are in the works for next year.

Curling is still the focus of the club, however; the board of directors has gotten two grants to entice people to join.

A Queens County Health Board grant paid for delivery sticks, which are used so curling stone throwers don't have to kneel down. It can be difficult for some players with disabilities or joint issues to get down to the right level, says Foster, so the sticks allow people to continue curling.

A grant from the Department of Health and Wellness has let them open the club on the first and third Saturday of each month for a free curl. Those take place at 7 p.m.

The club is also working to recruit the younger generation as well. It has 15 junior members, and around a dozen "little rocks" - beginning curlers. 

All ages of curling takes place during the day on Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings.

New curlers can join the club for $115 for the season.

With all this, and more in the works, Foster says they hope the club can be an important part of the community again. 

Over the past few years, the club has had to deal with aging equipment giving out. Two years ago it was the chiller, which was a $60,000 replacement. This year the dehumidifier broke down and required a replacement.

Membership is about on par from last year, says curling club board member Allen Foster, but board members want to increase the numbers.

"We're trying to make an active club again," he says.

The biggest issue, he says, is the number of current members is not enough to sustain the club long term. Even though most of their equipment woes are behind them, members still have to contend with large power bills.

However the executive is ready to tackle the challenges, says Foster.

"We have a great bunch of volunteers. Everyone does something," he says.

For example, instead of having one person take on certain duties, such as scraping and pebbling the ice, Foster says the duties are distributed it among several people. That makes it so curling can still take place if one person is sick or cannot make it in.

Foster says the board is trying to build up these social aspect of the club as well.

A new venture the club tried was a breakfast fundraiser. Foster says being the first one, organizers were unsure how many people would come out and planned for 80, but ended up selling out by 9:30 a.m. The cooks improvised a pancake breakfast to make it until 11 a.m., but the success showed the club it was on to something.

Going forward, the club will host breakfasts on the fourth Saturday of each month.

A turkey dinner was hosted on Dec. 14 as well, and more suppers are in the works for next year.

Curling is still the focus of the club, however; the board of directors has gotten two grants to entice people to join.

A Queens County Health Board grant paid for delivery sticks, which are used so curling stone throwers don't have to kneel down. It can be difficult for some players with disabilities or joint issues to get down to the right level, says Foster, so the sticks allow people to continue curling.

A grant from the Department of Health and Wellness has let them open the club on the first and third Saturday of each month for a free curl. Those take place at 7 p.m.

The club is also working to recruit the younger generation as well. It has 15 junior members, and around a dozen "little rocks" - beginning curlers. 

All ages of curling takes place during the day on Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings.

New curlers can join the club for $115 for the season.

With all this, and more in the works, Foster says they hope the club can be an important part of the community again. 

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