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Top notch testing key to getting NS wines global

Kings-Hants member of parliament and treasury board president Scott Brison holds and later took a sip of white wine from Luckett Vineyards, where he announced nearly $640,000 in federal funding to help Nova Scotia’s wine industry further expand into global markets.
Kings-Hants member of parliament and treasury board president Scott Brison holds and later took a sip of white wine from Luckett Vineyards, where he announced nearly $640,000 in federal funding to help Nova Scotia’s wine industry further expand into global markets. - Sara Ericsson

Winemaker Pete Luckett says being unique is province's 'only opportunity' to go global

WALLBROOK – Over half a million dollars is being invested in top-tier testing equipment to establish Nova Scotian wines at the next level – the global market.  

Treasury board president and Kings-Hants Member of Parliament Scott Brison was on hand at Luckett Vineyards to announce nearly $640,000 in federal funding for two export-related wine industry initiatives – a mobile filtration trailer, and a two-year plan to strategize the industry’s international market plan.

“As we go from world-class to world-leading, where we go from a region producing fine quality whites and sparklings to producing the world’s best..., it’s really important to invest in top-quality testing equipment,” said Brison.

The announcement detailed the two initiatives funded with non-repayable contributions – $398,200 and $241,606 respectively – through Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency programs.

Brison, who frequently mentions the province’s industry having grown from two to 22 producing wineries producing during his time in office, highlighted that Nova Scotia-produced wines are being served at Michelin three-star restaurants in London and Paris.

He said the new mobile system will increase the industry’s international foothold by providing testing and filtration for all wineries for both still and sparkling wines – something winery owner Pete Luckett agreed will be of massive benefit to the industry.

“It’s a crucial part of wine production, but to do it without this new system becomes time consuming, labour intensive, and a job every winemaker hates,” he said.

“This is a giant bonus to enable us to move faster and use this equipment on a shared basis.”

Brison compared the expected success of this new system to the portable bottling system that’s helped the industry quicken that process over the past year.

“Having a portable system, enabling wineries to share that expense and having the government invest in that critical infrastructure, is key,” said Brison, adding the system should be in place by 2019.

Luckett said this speeding up of production will also help boost product available to ship globally, part of the plan being headed by the Winery Association of Nova Scotia.

The association will work to craft a strategy for increasing sales of Nova Scotia wines exponentially. And Luckett, who believes the first two steps to dominating a market are having enough product and standing out, says things are looking good for the province’s industry.

“Being unique is our only opportunity to penetrate that international market – by being unique and special and producing different wine,” said Luckett.

“There’s an interest out there to try wine from new, emerging regions, so that really benefits Nova Scotia.”

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