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HANTS HISTORY: End of July 2019

In 1994, Chaker and Norma Rouhana, who moved to Windsor from Lebanon, were featured in the Hants Journal as they celebrated seven years in business running Curry’s Corner Foodmart.
In 1994, Chaker and Norma Rouhana, who moved to Windsor from Lebanon, were featured in the Hants Journal as they celebrated seven years in business running Curry’s Corner Foodmart. - FILE PHOTO
WINDSOR, N.S. —

Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

Fourteen-month-old Deseray Johnson, of Falmouth, was pictured on the front page of the July 6, 1994 Hants Journal showing her patriotic side. — File photos
Fourteen-month-old Deseray Johnson, of Falmouth, was pictured on the front page of the July 6, 1994 Hants Journal showing her patriotic side. — File photos

25 years ago (June 29 and July 6 and 13, 1994 editions)

• Windsor’s last army barracks was destroyed by fire. The building, located at the Windsor Country Fair, was being used to store the town’s Christmas decorations. The fire marked the second time the town had lost its Christmas decorations in a blaze. The fire was not suspicious in nature.

A tractor was also destroyed in the blaze, but the town’s Zamboni only received smoke damage.

• Work was underway to restore the William Hall Memorial in Hantsport. Larry Clayton was hired for his expertise to refurbish the monument in time for the centennial celebration in 1995. The stone monument was first constructed in 1944 by the late Embert Gollan and Robert Pulsifer, who both hailed from Hantsport.

• It was reported that as of June 19, 1994, there had been fewer deaths on Nova Scotia’s highways than the year prior. It was reported there were 25 deaths as a result of 21 accidents, compared to 32 deaths in 30 accidents for the same time frame. In 1990, there were 46 deaths in 39 accidents.

• RCMP were investigating reports of several headstones being toppled at the High Head Cemetery in Cambridge.

• Local astronomers were excited to witness comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 crash into Jupiter. About 21 large chunks of the broken comet were slated to violently hit the gaseous planet. It was noted the impacts would be “more violent than any atomic bomb ever exploded.”

• Jamie Reynolds, of Three Mile Plains, was selected to portray Sam Slick at events and festivals throughout the summer months.

• Veteran Windsor firefighter Norm Bennett, who was diagnosed with Parkinsons in 1989, was preparing to sit atop the fire departments’ new 100-foot ladder truck during the Sam Slick Festival weekend to raise awareness of the disease and money for research.

• Chaker and Norma Rouhana were featured in the Hants Journal as they celebrated seven years in business running Curry’s Corner Foodmart. The Rouhanas left Lebanon nine years prior due to the long civil war and said they enjoyed living, working and raising a family in Windsor.

The last army barracks in Windsor was destroyed by fire in 1994. The building, located at the Windsor Country Fair, was being used to store the town’s Christmas decorations. The fire marked the second time the town had lost its Christmas decorations in a blaze. The Zamboni received smoke damage and a tractor was lost.
The last army barracks in Windsor was destroyed by fire in 1994. The building, located at the Windsor Country Fair, was being used to store the town’s Christmas decorations. The fire marked the second time the town had lost its Christmas decorations in a blaze. The Zamboni received smoke damage and a tractor was lost.

While fishing for halibut in 1994, Wayne Boyd, of Falmouth, hooked a six foot, 200-pound mako shark off Scott’s Bay. The shark was sold to one of the large local grocery chains.
While fishing for halibut in 1994, Wayne Boyd, of Falmouth, hooked a six foot, 200-pound mako shark off Scott’s Bay. The shark was sold to one of the large local grocery chains.

Ashdale siblings Evan and Josh Manning visited a fawn that had wandered into the barn of their grandparents, Bob and Rosalie Macumber, of Centre Burlington on June 28, 1994. The fawn was discovered asleep in a stall. The fawn was taken to the Shubenacadie Wildlife Park.
Ashdale siblings Evan and Josh Manning visited a fawn that had wandered into the barn of their grandparents, Bob and Rosalie Macumber, of Centre Burlington on June 28, 1994. The fawn was discovered asleep in a stall. The fawn was taken to the Shubenacadie Wildlife Park.

• Robert Wayne Maxwell received an honorary diploma at the Nova Scotia Community College’s graduation ceremonies in Windsor. It was the first honorary degree presented.

His contribution to the local school dated back to 1988, when his proposal led to development of the correctional worker program – the only pre-employment training program of its kind in the province.

• A maple tree was planted in Windsor’s Victoria Park to remember two former Jaycettes: the late Judy Fry and Dena Jodrey.

• The Hants West Wildlife Habitat Advocates voted against the Department of Nova Scotia’s spring bear hunt. The members felt the fall bear hunt was adequate and suggested DNR and hunters do a better job managing the existing fall season.

• Former teacher Miss Maude Baker was celebrating her 103rd birthday. The Windsor Elms resident was born June 19, 1891 on Tancook Island.

• Wayne Boyd, of Falmouth, hooked a six foot, 200-pound mako shark off of Scott’s Bay.

• Windsor Lions Club member Roger Curtis received the Lions International Melvin Jones Award – the highest award that can be presented to a Lion.

Gisela Folker, seated, and Beth Thompson, Nicoline Hussey and Jennifer Buchanan were ready to help guide visitors around Hantsport’s Churchill House during the summer of 1994. It was reported that the anchor on the lawn was from one of Ezra Churchill’s ships.
Gisela Folker, seated, and Beth Thompson, Nicoline Hussey and Jennifer Buchanan were ready to help guide visitors around Hantsport’s Churchill House during the summer of 1994. It was reported that the anchor on the lawn was from one of Ezra Churchill’s ships.

In 1994, West Hants Historical Society Museum summer student Melodie Daniels helped show Allison Munroe, of Scotch Village, and Dean Brunet, of Ashdale, how people used to churn butter.
In 1994, West Hants Historical Society Museum summer student Melodie Daniels helped show Allison Munroe, of Scotch Village, and Dean Brunet, of Ashdale, how people used to churn butter.

50 years ago (June 25 and July 2 and 9, 1969 editions)

• Hantsport’s Dominion Day celebrations were reported to be getting bigger and better, and this year, the weather cooperated.

Jack Meades won the $100 bill that was up for grabs at the Hantsport fair.

A list of prize winners for the children’s parade appeared, included among them were Kimberley and Angela Pulsifer (most outstanding float); the Elliott twins – Robin and Phil Elliott (best couple); Mike Nason (most humourous); and Julie, Danny and John Arsenault (most patriotic).

• The Dick Beazley Memorial Five Mile Race in Hantsport saw Ray Will, of Dartmouth, finish first in 26 minutes and four-fifth seconds. Lunenburg’s Brian Kane took second place. A total of 13 people competed, with 10 finishing the course. Wayne Beazley, the son of Dick Beazley, finished the race in fourth place.

• The community was in mourning after two separate accidents claimed the lives of local residents.

A tractor overturned and killed Ralph Whitehead, of Three Mile Plains, while he was working at the Spence Farm, and 16-year-old Tony Leighton, of Windsor, was killed following a motorcycle-car collision in Three Mile Plains.

• An early morning fire call to the Domtar Plant on O’Brien Street in Windsor resulted in damage to the drying room and a motor.

• Cliff Robertson, the 1968 Academy Award winner for Best Actor, visited Windsor to officially open Kings Meadows on Chester Road June 22, 1969.

The residence, which was formerly the home of Dr. H.E. Kendall, a lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia, was transformed into a home for young handicapped adults.

• The Windsor Fire Department welcomed its new piece of a firefighting apparatus: a tanker that had been mounted on an International chassis with the capacity of 3200 gallons of water.

• Cpl. D. G. Killen, of Windsor, completed a 20-week course from the Survival Training School at CFB Edmonton. He was considered a para-rescue specialist with the Canadian Forces 413 Search and Rescue Squadron, based out of P.E.I.

The 1994 Avondale Wharf Days held a reenactment of the arrival of the New England planters. When the early settlers arrived in Newport Landing, they had the protection of troops stationed at Fort Edward, in Windsor. Pictured are members depicting the 2nd Battalion, 84th Royal Highland Immigrants, who were stationed at the fort in 1788, and the 2nd Company Gorham’s Rangers, who were posted at the fort in 1744.
The 1994 Avondale Wharf Days held a reenactment of the arrival of the New England planters. When the early settlers arrived in Newport Landing, they had the protection of troops stationed at Fort Edward, in Windsor. Pictured are members depicting the 2nd Battalion, 84th Royal Highland Immigrants, who were stationed at the fort in 1788, and the 2nd Company Gorham’s Rangers, who were posted at the fort in 1744.

• Third class constable G.B. Woodman, of Falmouth, joined the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in November 1968 and successfully completed training in June 1969. His first posting was in Manitoba.

• The Windsor Swimming Pool opened for the summer season on June 28. A total of 575 children were registered for classes plus 16 adults.

The pool director was Vaughn Thompson; the local swim team was being coached by Freddie Wile, with Ann and Barb Curry assisting.

• Heather Blackburn, of Maitland, was crowned queen at the annual Rawdon Picnic. The first lady-in-waiting was Lynn Malka, of West Gore, and the second lady-in-waiting was Carol Mosher, of Mosherville.

• The fate of one of Falmouth’s oldest houses was pondered. The home, located on the corner near the baptist church, was originally owned by Col. Wm. Shay and in 1880, was sold to Henry Pineo, who was the father of the late Otis Illsley. The widow of Illsley’s son, William Illsley, owned the property. At the time of the Journal’s report, the home was believed to be a 200-year-old French log cabin. There was interest expressed in preserving it by several groups.

• The Imperial Theatre in Windsor was showing Walt Disney’s Blackbeard’s Ghost, shoot-’em-up flicks 40 Guns to Apache Pass and Warkill, the fun romp Nobody’s Perfect, starring Doug McClure and  Nancy Kwan, plus The Wrecking Crew, Tarzan Goes to India, and Berserk!, starring Joan Crawford. In early July, theatre goers would be able to watch Charly, which starred Academy Award winner Cliff Robertson. Finally, adults were being advised to leave the children at home if they were to attend The Conqueror Worm. That show was slated for 9 p.m. on a Sunday.

• In the Hants History column dating back to 1944, Mildred Roechling was congratulated after completing 25 years as the lady principal at the Edgehill School for Girls in Windsor.

In wartime news from 1944, L/Sgt. Harley E. Frizzell, of Windsor, was killed in action, as was L/Cpl. Leonard Colbert, of Kennetcook. Pte. Aldred George Stevens, of Falmouth, was reported as missing in action, and Pte. Basil Frank, of Three Mile Plains, and Pte. W. McMullin, of Milford Station, were both listed as wounded overseas.

In the Hants History column from 1919, gasoline was selling for 37 to 40 cents per gallon, and Windsor town council voted to purchase a $13,000 white triple combination fire engine. In odd news, Capt. T.A. Card, of Summerville, returned home following a year’s absence on the high seas. Where he was during that year was unknown.

The Ladies Division of the Avon Valley Golf and Country Club held its annual strawberry luncheon. The nine-hole event saw all 39 competitors walk away a winner. Some of the 1994 participants were, from left, back row: Sue Obey, Pat Burbidge, Lena Milligan, Rae Miller, Judy Bain and Effie Scott; front row: Judy Dauphinee, Karen MacDonald, Lisa Dauphinee, Joanne Kennedy, and Brenda MacKellar.
The Ladies Division of the Avon Valley Golf and Country Club held its annual strawberry luncheon. The nine-hole event saw all 39 competitors walk away a winner. Some of the 1994 participants were, from left, back row: Sue Obey, Pat Burbidge, Lena Milligan, Rae Miller, Judy Bain and Effie Scott; front row: Judy Dauphinee, Karen MacDonald, Lisa Dauphinee, Joanne Kennedy, and Brenda MacKellar.

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