Top News

Living the Dream: Cochrane and Kinsella Noseworthy-Smith close on and off the field


WOLFVILLE - “We’ve been close all our lives,” say Wolfville siblings Cochrane and Kinsella Noseworthy-Smith.

Cochrane and Kinsella, who are just 15 months apart in age, are the only two children in their family. Today, as Acadia students and varsity soccer players on their respective teams, Cochrane and Kinsella are still close.

Cochrane, 21, is in his fourth year at Acadia, but his third year of actual study as he spent most of one school year in a co-op placement at the Acadia Entrepreneurship Centre, part of his accounting studies.

Kinsella, 20, is in the third year of a science degree after switching her major last year from biology to psychology with neuroscience.

Asked if there was a sibling rivalry growing up, Kinsella says, “the competitiveness was always there, but it was more me being competitive with Cochrane. He’s only 15 months older, but I’ve always looked up to him, and I always learned a lot from watching him play.”

The two also closely follow each other’s careers – which, needless to say, is a lot easier than it would be if they were at two different universities.

“We’re both attacking wingers,” Cochrane said, “and we both wear the same number, 10.”

As well, Kinsella said, “we usually have a little bet – $20 for whoever scores the most goals in a season. Last year, I won.”

 

Acadia bound

After graduating from Horton, Cochrane knew he wanted to stay in Nova Scotia to attend university.

“I looked at Dal and Saint Mary’s, but our dad went here and played soccer here, which helped move Acadia to the top of the list,” he said.

Kinsella followed in their footsteps the following year, adding that their father’s influence “is a big part of why we like soccer.”

Originally, she said, “when I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do with my education, I thought I’d like to go away to school.”

By Grade 11, she had pretty much decided on Acadia. “I decided I wanted to stay home and be able to play here.”

Both siblings are enjoying being Acadia students, and all that goes along with that. They also really enjoy playing soccer close to home.

“When I first joined the Axemen,” Cochrane said, “they were still in a rebuilding phase. I expected to get a lot of playing time, and be able to build the team to where it is today.”

In his freshman year, the Axemen won just one regular season game. Last year, they qualified for the playoffs for the first time since the program was brought back.

“It was a big step for us, and one we’ve been building on so far this season,” he said.

“Last year, we had 18 points all season,” an improvement over the previous year. “This year, we have 15 points already.”

Kinsella joined the Axewomen soccer program in a rebuilding year as well. By her second year, the process was pretty much complete, or, she said “at least the best we could. We placed third overall, and made it to the conference final.”

This year, the Axewomen, like the Axemen, are among the league leaders.

“It’s been a huge step,” Kinsella said, “and in just two years.”

 

Looking ahead

Cochrane plans to play next year as well, his fifth year of eligibility.

“It’s a decision I made probably halfway through my studies, to take a four-year degree in five years.”

He has also done three terms at the Entrepreneurship Centre so far.

“I didn’t really know this is what I wanted to do until I started studying here, but it’s been my goal ever since then.” He qualified that by saying, “it’s my goal for now. I know it could always change with time.”

Kinsella is also planning to spend five years at Acadia, especially after she shifted majors. “It’s my third year, but only my second in the program I’m in. I started out wanting to be a marine biologist, but I changed my mind.”

She is planning to do a masters and Ph.D. eventually

“I’ll likely be in school for a while. Our dad has his masters, and says he’s always wished he had gotten his Ph.D. as well. I guess that’s inspiring me.”

Kinsella is involved with Acadia’s SMILE program, and both siblings take part in their teams’ efforts towards Run for the Cure and the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

“When you’re a student-athlete, your teams tend to get involved in things as a matter of course, but there are personal expectations as well,” she said. “It’s fun; it gets your mind away from school and sport, and it’s nice to be able to give back.”

She added that both she and her brother “grew up watching Acadia sports. It was a big part of growing up for both of us.”

Cochrane and Kinsella have played soccer since they were young children. Both have played Tier 1 soccer with Valley United since U-14, and now, both play with the Valley United senior teams. And, they say, they both want to keep playing “as long as we can.”

 

Cochrane and Kinsella, who are just 15 months apart in age, are the only two children in their family. Today, as Acadia students and varsity soccer players on their respective teams, Cochrane and Kinsella are still close.

Cochrane, 21, is in his fourth year at Acadia, but his third year of actual study as he spent most of one school year in a co-op placement at the Acadia Entrepreneurship Centre, part of his accounting studies.

Kinsella, 20, is in the third year of a science degree after switching her major last year from biology to psychology with neuroscience.

Asked if there was a sibling rivalry growing up, Kinsella says, “the competitiveness was always there, but it was more me being competitive with Cochrane. He’s only 15 months older, but I’ve always looked up to him, and I always learned a lot from watching him play.”

The two also closely follow each other’s careers – which, needless to say, is a lot easier than it would be if they were at two different universities.

“We’re both attacking wingers,” Cochrane said, “and we both wear the same number, 10.”

As well, Kinsella said, “we usually have a little bet – $20 for whoever scores the most goals in a season. Last year, I won.”

 

Acadia bound

After graduating from Horton, Cochrane knew he wanted to stay in Nova Scotia to attend university.

“I looked at Dal and Saint Mary’s, but our dad went here and played soccer here, which helped move Acadia to the top of the list,” he said.

Kinsella followed in their footsteps the following year, adding that their father’s influence “is a big part of why we like soccer.”

Originally, she said, “when I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do with my education, I thought I’d like to go away to school.”

By Grade 11, she had pretty much decided on Acadia. “I decided I wanted to stay home and be able to play here.”

Both siblings are enjoying being Acadia students, and all that goes along with that. They also really enjoy playing soccer close to home.

“When I first joined the Axemen,” Cochrane said, “they were still in a rebuilding phase. I expected to get a lot of playing time, and be able to build the team to where it is today.”

In his freshman year, the Axemen won just one regular season game. Last year, they qualified for the playoffs for the first time since the program was brought back.

“It was a big step for us, and one we’ve been building on so far this season,” he said.

“Last year, we had 18 points all season,” an improvement over the previous year. “This year, we have 15 points already.”

Kinsella joined the Axewomen soccer program in a rebuilding year as well. By her second year, the process was pretty much complete, or, she said “at least the best we could. We placed third overall, and made it to the conference final.”

This year, the Axewomen, like the Axemen, are among the league leaders.

“It’s been a huge step,” Kinsella said, “and in just two years.”

 

Looking ahead

Cochrane plans to play next year as well, his fifth year of eligibility.

“It’s a decision I made probably halfway through my studies, to take a four-year degree in five years.”

He has also done three terms at the Entrepreneurship Centre so far.

“I didn’t really know this is what I wanted to do until I started studying here, but it’s been my goal ever since then.” He qualified that by saying, “it’s my goal for now. I know it could always change with time.”

Kinsella is also planning to spend five years at Acadia, especially after she shifted majors. “It’s my third year, but only my second in the program I’m in. I started out wanting to be a marine biologist, but I changed my mind.”

She is planning to do a masters and Ph.D. eventually

“I’ll likely be in school for a while. Our dad has his masters, and says he’s always wished he had gotten his Ph.D. as well. I guess that’s inspiring me.”

Kinsella is involved with Acadia’s SMILE program, and both siblings take part in their teams’ efforts towards Run for the Cure and the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

“When you’re a student-athlete, your teams tend to get involved in things as a matter of course, but there are personal expectations as well,” she said. “It’s fun; it gets your mind away from school and sport, and it’s nice to be able to give back.”

She added that both she and her brother “grew up watching Acadia sports. It was a big part of growing up for both of us.”

Cochrane and Kinsella have played soccer since they were young children. Both have played Tier 1 soccer with Valley United since U-14, and now, both play with the Valley United senior teams. And, they say, they both want to keep playing “as long as we can.”

 

Recent Stories