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Fay rink win ‘priceless’ experience for Burgess family

The Burgess family has racked up many miles following each other’s curling adventures over the years. Pictured are Karlee, Allyson, Andrew, Craig, Judy and Jim at last year’s Canadian junior championship.
The Burgess family has racked up many miles following each other’s curling adventures over the years. Pictured are Karlee, Allyson, Andrew, Craig, Judy and Jim at last year’s Canadian junior championship.

TC MEDIA - Memories of 1987 came flooding back to Craig Burgess as he watched his daughter play beneath the TV lights.

Twenty-nine years ago, he and his New Brunswick teammates needed their last shot to defeat a young Wayne Middaugh and become national champions.

Now Craig watched as his daughter followed his footsteps with her friends, cementing their spot as the best young curlers in Canada.

“It’s something you dream about, and then back in ’87 it happened for us,” he said. “It’s just unbelievable it can happen to your daughter, too.”

Craig and his wife, Allyson, made the trip to Stratford, Ont.,  along with their son, Andrew, and Craig’s father, Jim. In a week, the entourage will follow Karlee to Norway for the Youth Olympics. Then, maybe, they’ll head to Denmark for the World Junior Curling Championships.

“We’re not sure if we’ll have jobs when we come back,” Allyson joked. “We’ll only have about a week to look at our options. But it’s one of those things, you want to be there with your kid because you never know when you’ll get this opportunity again.”

Only their credit card company could put a value on the experience, Craig joked.

“You can pay whatever to see the smile and the reaction from your daughter’s win. To me, it’s priceless.”

Allyson watched nervously Jan. 31 relying on messages of support from home, some reminding her to breathe. In the ninth end, B.C. skip Sarah Daniels missed a shot to move within one point. Team Fay went ahead by four instead.

“All of a sudden it kind of hit home,” she said.

Their daughter’s team had earned the right to represent the nation.

“It’s tough to express that in words,” said Craig, who went on to win the world junior championship in 1988. “Once you put the Canadian flag on your back and slide out for the first time… It means so much. It’s so special to represent your country. That’s what happened for me and I know that’s what is going to happen for her.”

When asked who she wanted to share the win with the most, Karlee didn’t hesitate to say her family.

“I couldn’t have done it without any of them. And considering eight people from my family are coming to Norway is unbelievable. I don’t really know who is going to Denmark yet, but I just couldn’t do it without any of my family. They’re amazing.”

Twenty-nine years ago, he and his New Brunswick teammates needed their last shot to defeat a young Wayne Middaugh and become national champions.

Now Craig watched as his daughter followed his footsteps with her friends, cementing their spot as the best young curlers in Canada.

“It’s something you dream about, and then back in ’87 it happened for us,” he said. “It’s just unbelievable it can happen to your daughter, too.”

Craig and his wife, Allyson, made the trip to Stratford, Ont.,  along with their son, Andrew, and Craig’s father, Jim. In a week, the entourage will follow Karlee to Norway for the Youth Olympics. Then, maybe, they’ll head to Denmark for the World Junior Curling Championships.

“We’re not sure if we’ll have jobs when we come back,” Allyson joked. “We’ll only have about a week to look at our options. But it’s one of those things, you want to be there with your kid because you never know when you’ll get this opportunity again.”

Only their credit card company could put a value on the experience, Craig joked.

“You can pay whatever to see the smile and the reaction from your daughter’s win. To me, it’s priceless.”

Allyson watched nervously Jan. 31 relying on messages of support from home, some reminding her to breathe. In the ninth end, B.C. skip Sarah Daniels missed a shot to move within one point. Team Fay went ahead by four instead.

“All of a sudden it kind of hit home,” she said.

Their daughter’s team had earned the right to represent the nation.

“It’s tough to express that in words,” said Craig, who went on to win the world junior championship in 1988. “Once you put the Canadian flag on your back and slide out for the first time… It means so much. It’s so special to represent your country. That’s what happened for me and I know that’s what is going to happen for her.”

When asked who she wanted to share the win with the most, Karlee didn’t hesitate to say her family.

“I couldn’t have done it without any of them. And considering eight people from my family are coming to Norway is unbelievable. I don’t really know who is going to Denmark yet, but I just couldn’t do it without any of my family. They’re amazing.”

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