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Hants History: May 1, 2018 edition


Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

25 years ago (April 28 and May 5, 1993 editions)

• The Town of Windsor was honouring the late Judy Fry by creating the Judy Fry Memorial Volunteer Award, which would be presented each year to a volunteer the town deemed to be worthy of the honour.

• Heidi McAdoo, 19, was crowned Princess Windsor 1993. The first lady-in-waiting, who was also named Miss Congeniality, was Lynn Woodman. The second lady-in-waiting was Shira Dauphinee.

• Rebekah Price was selected as Princess Hantsport. She was one of four contestants who vied for the crown. The first lady-in-waiting honours went to 20-year-old Tyra Starratt, also of Hants Border.

• West Hants school officials were wondering what happened after local students had a poor showing during the 1992 Nova Scotia Achievement Tests.

• After a family's pet was put down by Windsor's bylaw enforcement officer after it had only been impounded for four hours, town council announced it would revisit its dog bylaw.

• Windsor Regional High School collected close to $1,000 in pennies to donate to the IWK Hospital.

• Pothier Motors, a dealership located in Falmouth, was recognized for being a Chrysler dealer for 25 years.

• Hockey stars Josh Dill, of Scotch Village, and Mike Fletcher, of Rawdon, were selected once again for the provincial AAA all-star team. Both were Hants West Rural High School students. Dill was to play major peewee with the Nova Scotia AAA Young Citadels while Fletcher was to play major bantam with the Nova Scotia AAA Selects.

Wave buoys destined for Waltham, Massachusetts, were being constructed in Windsor by Eastech Limited plant in 1968. Pictured here are plant employees Wayne Humphreys and David Clark. The buoys were to transmit wave data via radio telemetry to various receiving stations.
Wave buoys destined for Waltham, Massachusetts, were being constructed in Windsor by Eastech Limited plant in 1968. Pictured here are plant employees Wayne Humphreys and David Clark. The buoys were to transmit wave data via radio telemetry to various receiving stations.

50 years ago (April 24 and May 1, 1968 editions)

• The Hants Regional Vocational School was nearing completion. The school, which was located next to the Windsor Regional High School on Wentworth Road, was going to offer the following occupations: beauty culture, carpentry, drafting – mechanical, electronics – radio and television, electrical construction, machine shop practice, motor vehicle repair, plumbing, and welding – gas and arc.

• Tenders were called for the proposed causeway-dam across the Avon River in Windsor.

• Gail Sanford, of Windsor, was one of 10 medical laboratory technicians who graduated from a 19-month course at the Colchester Hospital. She received the best all-around student award at graduation and was asked to stay on at the hospital.

• The Windsor-based construction firm of Gordon and Curtis Swinamer was awarded the contract to build a new post office in Lantz. The bid was $33,500 and was the lowest of the nine received.

• Windsor's Eastech Limited plant was helping to produce a large shipment of wave buoys that were destined for Waltham, Massachusetts. The buoys were to be used to measure wave heights as part of the long-term, world-wide oceanographic survey.

• Robert C. Dimock, the chair of the Windsor Board of Trade, wanted to see progress made on setting up an agricultural museum in Windsor and spent “considerable time” discussing the matter at the meeting.

• Six candidates competed for the honour of representing Hantsport at the Apple Blossom Festival. Heather Tracey, 20, was the successful candidate and was crowned Princess Hantsport 1968.

• Sixty-five archers competed at the Nova Scotia Indoor Archery Championships in Greenwood. Bob Mack, of Hantsport, won the men's freestyle event while Francis Hill, also of Hantsport, won the women's freestyle event.

• Former Windsor man, Randy Miller, was praised by the Hockey News for his play with the Springfield Kings, based out of Massachusetts.

• Dominion Stores' springarama advertisement listed a number of deals for shoppers, including ham for 55 cents a pound, iceberg lettuce for 19 cents a head, and one pound of butter for 65 cents.

• The Imperial Theatre in Windsor was showing Clambake, which starred Elvis, Welcome to Hard Times, a western featuring Henry Fonda and Janice Rule, The Long Duel, an adventure drama about nomadic people, Sergeant Ryker, starring Lee Marvin, Hot Rods to Hell, starring Dana Andrews and Jeanne Crain, plus A Matter of Innocence, a romantic drama with Hayley Mills, Trevor Howard and Kalen Lui.

• In the Hants History column dating back to 1943, falling rocks at the Newport gypsum quarry killed Edward Dykens, of Three Mile Plains.

In sports news from 1943, it was reported that the trophy for those playing Nova Scotia Senior Hockey went missing. The trophy was to be presented to the RCAF team but couldn't be located.

In odd news from 1918, loafing (modern day loitering) was declared illegal in Canada for everyone between the ages of 16 and 60. As well, construction work on the “kissing bridge” was well-underway.

In wartime news from 1918, Lieut. G. O. McDonald drowned at Filehurst on the Thames in England. He had been stationed in Windsor for a time. Leroy L. Lawrence, of Hantsport, and Elroy Ettinger, of East Noel Road, died from their wounds while fighting overseas.

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