We asked: How should we educate children about the First World War?

Jennifer
Jennifer Hoegg
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Published on August 06, 2014

Christine Renaud of Falmouth, Hants County:

"I would hope that you would educate children about every war, not just the first one. The first one, the last one and the reasons that there really shouldn’t be one."

 

Published on August 06, 2014

Mary Bent of Kentville, Kings County:

“They need to hear the stories of the young people who went off to war and what they gave up to protect our freedom. When I was growing up we never really talked about that. If we keep talking about it, maybe it will never happen again.” 

Published on August 06, 2014

Sheldon Gidney, Digby, Digby County: "I would think the school system is the best way to reach the children. This place is rich in history; we have war monuments all over town – every town does but who stops and reads them? The teachers could take the children around and talk about them. The history is right under our noses."

 

Published on August 06, 2014

Carly Churchill, Yarmouth, Yarmouth County:

"I think we should educate our children by telling them the stories that have been passed down by our veterans, andmake them understand the importance of the sacrifice they gave for our country. Showing them different artifacts and hearing the stories from war time and how different life was in the early 1900s compared to now would begin to give them an understanding of the great sacrifice the service men and women gave for our country."

Published on August 08, 2014

Graham M. Nickerson, Shelburne County: "Make "All Quiet on the Western Front" a mandatory reading for the appropriate grade level."

Leading up to Remembrance Day, TC Media weekly newspapers in western Nova Scotia will be highlighting stories connected to the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the First World War.

Canada was called into the conflict 100 years ago this week -  Aug. 4, 2014 - when Britain joined the war.

With the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the First World War upon us we asked: With few people left who have a first-hand memory of the First World War, how should we educate children about it?

You answered: 

Christine Renaud of Falmouth, Hants County: 

"I would hope that you would educate children about every war, not just the first one. The first one, the last one and the reasons that there really shouldn’t be one."

Mary Bent of Kentville, Kings County:

“They need to hear the stories of the young people who went off to war and what they gave up to protect our freedom. When I was growing up we never really talked about that. If we keep talking about it, maybe it will never happen again.” 

Sheldon Gidne of Digby, Digby County: 

"I would think the school system is the best way to reach the children. This place is rich in history; we have war monuments all over town – every town does but who stops and reads them? The teachers could take the children around and talk about them. The history is right under our noses."

Carly Churchill of Yarmouth, Yarmouth County:

"I think we should educate our children by telling them the stories that have been passed down by our veterans, andmake them understand the importance of the sacrifice they gave for our country. Showing them different artifacts and hearing the stories from war time and how different life was in the early 1900s compared to now would begin to give them an understanding of the great sacrifice the service men and women gave for our country."

Graham M. Nickerson, Shelburne County:

"Make "All Quiet on the Western Front" a mandatory reading for the appropriate grade level." 

 

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