Blades turning on first Shelburne municipal wind power project

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Amy Woolvett
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By Amy Woolvett
THE COAST GUARD
NovaNewsNow.com

The Municipality of Shelburne is finally seeing some revenue kick in for its first operational Community Feed-In Tariff (COMFIT) wind turbine.

The small 50-kilowatt wind project, owned by the municipality, is operational in Sandy Point and has seen its first profits.

The quiet and tucked away wind turbine is generating $4-5,000 per month.  The municipality is receiving 49.9 cents per kilowatt-hour and expects to generate $15,000 per year.

The wind power generated is fed into Nova Scotia Power and the power company then pays the municipality.

Funding for the project was though the federal gas tax funding put in place to promote infrastructure both beneficial and sustainable to the environment.

It is expected that the province-wide COMFIT program will help Nova Scotia reach its renewable energy goal of 25-percent by 2015 and 40-percent by 2020.  The province has aimed for 100 megawatts of electricity to be produced through the COMFIT program.

The municipality was approved by the province to build a much larger feed-in tariff but council has not decide whether to move forward on the project.

“With a bigger turbine you would get a better rate but the capital costs would be much higher,” said CAO of the municipality, Kirk Cox.

 

 

Organizations: Nova Scotia Power

Geographic location: Shelburne, Sandy Point, Nova Scotia

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Recent comments

  • Cathy C
    March 02, 2014 - 02:59

    What cynical men you have commenting on this story..I've heard that studies show if you expect windmills to make you sick, they will. The flip side of the placebo effect. I stood under the windmills at the NS--NB border and I couldn't hear a thing--except the highway! And if NSP wants to pay Shelburne almost 50 cents a kwh--I say great! It's about time Shelburne got a break--we don't even have high speed internet out here and they took away our MLA. I say congrats to the local visionaries who made this happen--and carry on despite the many nay-sayers.

  • Cathy C
    March 02, 2014 - 02:57

    What cynical men you have commenting on this story..I've heard that studies show if you expect windmills to make you sick, they will. The flip side of the placebo effect. I stood under the windmills at the NS--NB border and I couldn't hear a thing--except the highway! And if NSP wants to pay Shelburne almost 50 cents a kwh--I say great! It's about time Shelburne got a break--we don't even have high speed internet out here and they took away our MLA. I say congrats to the local visionaries who made this happen--and carry on despite the many nay-sayers.

  • Paul Candler
    February 27, 2014 - 06:42

    You might want to reconsider. Take the time to investigate the adverse affects of wind turbines in Ontario. Starting this spring they are erecting one hundred and forty new five hundred foot high turbines just north of Goderich. Apart from killing birds, bats and other animal species these monsters are causing health issues in humans and driving down property values.

  • Peter
    February 26, 2014 - 17:18

    The tree huggers cut down all the trees and poured several tons of concrete,erected a structure that will kill raptures and bats and put alot of people on the proverty line into energy poverty. It will devalue the land surrounding it by up to 20% minumum and it didn't and will not sound quiet. Look up www.windconcernsontario.ca and see what the total and idiotic 16th century reinvention that works great for milling flour and pumping water in dyke situations. There are other designs that do no harm,especially the infra sound that just might make you sick. The capital cost probably is $750,000 or there about, a clinic might have been a slight better investment,or paved some roads or,or

  • George Handel
    February 26, 2014 - 09:23

    WOW! This is SO economically unique! NSP is buying wind power at 49.9 cents per KWH, and selling it at 13.79 cents per KWH (source - my NSP bill). Must be a marketing plan developed by a "tree hugger" with a PHD in economics.